what are symptoms for a heart attack

Heart Attack Symptoms in Women

Jan 20, Typical heart attack symptoms. Chest discomfort or pain. This discomfort or pain can feel like a tight ache, pressure, fullness or squeezing in your chest lasting more than a few minutes. This discomfort may come and go. Upper body pain. Jan 11, The major symptoms of a heart attack are Chest pain or discomfort. Most heart attacks involve discomfort in the center or left side of the chest that lasts for more than a few minutes or that goes away and comes back. The discomfort can feel like uncomfortable pressure, squeezing, fullness, or pain.

Heart attack symptoms can vary widely. For instance, you may have only minor chest discomfort while someone else has excruciating pain.

One thing applies to everyone, though: If you suspect that you're having a heart attack, call or your local emergency medical services number. If you don't have access to emergency medical services, have someone drive you to the nearest hospital. Drive yourself only as a last resort, if there are absolutely no other options.

Movies and What are symptoms for a heart attack often portray heart attacks as dramatic, chest-clutching events. But heart attacks often begin with subtle symptoms such as discomfort that may not even be described as pain. It can be tempting to what are symptoms for a heart attack to downplay your symptoms or brush them off as indigestion or anxiety. But don't "tough out" heart attack symptoms for more than five minutes.

Call or other emergency medical services for help. Women may have all, many, a few or none of the typical heart attack symptoms. Some type of pain, pressure or discomfort in the chest is still a common symptom of a heart attack in women. However, many women have heart attack symptoms without chest pain. They may include:. Older adults and people with diabetes may have no or very mild symptoms of a heart attack.

Never dismiss heart attack symptoms, even if they don't seem serious. Mayo What will happen if we does not endorse companies or products.

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Heart attack symptoms: Know what's a medical emergency. Products and services. Free E-newsletter Subscribe to Housecall Our general interest e-newsletter keeps you up to date on a wide variety of health topics. Sign up now. Heart attack symptoms: Know what's a medical emergency Whether your symptoms seem obvious or are more subtle, take them seriously and get medical care. By Mayo Clinic Staff.

Show references Cydulka RK, et al. Chest pain. In: Tintinalli's Emergency Medicine Manual. McGraw-Hill Education; Stouffer GA, et al.

The history and physical examination. In: Netter's Cardiology. Elsevier; Accessed April how to draw a self portrait youtube, Heart attack. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. Papadakis MA, et al. Heart disease: Symptoms and signs. Symptoms of a heart attack.

American Heart Association. Accessed April 13, Deedwania PC. Silent myocardial ischemia: Epidemiology, diagnosis, treatment and prognosis. See also Abdominal pain Angina treatment: Stents, drugs, lifestyle changes What's best? Can vitamins help prevent a heart attack? Chest X-rays Coronary angiogram Coronary artery disease Coronary what are symptoms for a heart attack disease: Angioplasty or bypass surgery?

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Symptoms vary between men and women

Apr 10, Symptoms of a heart attack in men include: standard chest pain/pressure that feels like an elephant is sitting on your chest, with a squeezing sensation that may come and go or remain constant. Oct 01, Symptoms of a heart attack include: Discomfort, pressure, heaviness, tightness, squeezing, or pain in your chest or arm or below your breastbone. Discomfort that goes into your back, jaw, throat, or arm. Fullness, indigestion, or a choking feeling (it may feel like heartburn) Sweating, upset. Feb 14, Overview. During a heart attack, the blood supply that normally nourishes the heart with oxygen is cut off and the heart muscle begins to die. Heart attacks also called myocardial infarctions.

The more time that passes without treatment to restore blood flow, the greater the damage to the heart muscle. Coronary artery disease CAD is the main cause of heart attack. A less common cause is a severe spasm, or sudden contraction, of a coronary artery that can stop blood flow to the heart muscle. Other symptoms of a heart attack could include unusual or unexplained tiredness and nausea or vomiting. Women are more likely to have these other symptoms. Learn more about women and heart disease.

Every 40 seconds, someone in the United States has a heart attack. If you notice the symptoms of a heart attack in yourself or someone else, call immediately.

The sooner you get to an emergency room, the sooner you can get treatment to reduce the amount of damage to the heart muscle. At the hospital, health care professionals can run tests to find out if a heart attack is happening and decide the best treatment.

In some cases, a heart attack requires cardiopulmonary resuscitation CPR or an electrical shock defibrillation to the heart to get the heart pumping again. Bystanders trained to use CPR or a defibrillator may be able to help until emergency medical personnel arrive. Remember, the chances of surviving a heart attack are better the sooner emergency treatment begins.

Several health conditions, your lifestyle, and your age and family history can increase your risk for heart disease and heart attack. These are called risk factors. About half of all Americans have at least one of the three key risk factors for heart disease: high blood pressure, high blood cholesterol, and smoking. Some risk factors cannot be controlled, such as your age or family history. But you can take steps to lower your risk by changing the factors you can control.

Learn more about risk factors for heart disease and heart attack. Take our quiz external icon to see how much you know about cardiac rehabilitation. You may also be at risk for another heart attack or conditions such as stroke , kidney disorders, and peripheral arterial disease PAD. You can lower your chances of having future health problems following a heart attack with these steps:. A team of people may help you through cardiac rehab, including your health care team, exercise and nutrition specialists, physical therapists, and counselors or mental health professionals.

Skip directly to site content Skip directly to page options Skip directly to A-Z link. Heart Disease. Section Navigation. Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Syndicate. Heart Attack Symptoms, Risk, and Recovery. Minus Related Pages. What is a heart attack? What are the symptoms of heart attack? The major symptoms of a heart attack are Chest pain or discomfort. Most heart attacks involve discomfort in the center or left side of the chest that lasts for more than a few minutes or that goes away and comes back.

The discomfort can feel like uncomfortable pressure, squeezing, fullness, or pain. Feeling weak, light-headed, or faint. You may also break out into a cold sweat.

Pain or discomfort in the jaw, neck, or back. Pain or discomfort in one or both arms or shoulders. Shortness of breath. This often comes along with chest discomfort, but shortness of breath also can happen before chest discomfort. What are the risk factors for heart attack? What can I do to recover after a heart attack? Heart disease and stroke statistics update: a report from the American Heart Association. NCHS data brief, no. Accessed May 9, Get Email Updates. To receive email updates about this page, enter your email address: Email Address.

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