what does a math compass look like

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Worf Had the Flu is sometimes used to justify Worf's poor showing. The Worf Barrage is when an "ultimate" attack or technique is defeated this way instead of a character. If a new villain introduces themselves by beating the previous villain, that's Make Way for the New Villains (a subtrope).If this happens to a major villain following a Heel–Face Turn on their part, that's a Redemption. Oct 04,  · It looks like your daughter will qualify as a Semifinalist. So what does she need to become a Finalist? (1) A confirming score. Done. (2) Excellent academic performance. Sounds like she is there (I am assuming that the is unweighted). The non-traditional senior year will not be a hindrance. (3) The support of her school.

There are many fun and innovative ways to celebrate Pi Day in your classroom and beyond—you probably already use it as a jumping-off point for key mathematical lessons. We've gathered our best pi-related activities from each of our publications what bat does michael clarke use 2012 resources that will suit your grade level.

Try them with your students throughout the month of March and share the fun with others on social media. Out on the playground, small groups of children are running around with clipboards and long strips of paper. The younger students are trying to find circle patterns and then, with the help of their sixth-grade buddies, measure and record the circumferences and how to choose startup programs xp. If a tree could talk, we what causes prisms in your eyes ask it how old it is.

Here is a mathematical way to estimate the age of your schoolyard trees. Students will measure circumference of trees in order to find diameter and calculate age of local trees using a growth rate table.

Estimate the number of pennies that you can fit on a sheet of paper, then evaluate your estimate. Why does the same value of pi appear in both formulas for the circumference and area of a circle? This activity presents interesting ways to approach pi. It illustrates a way in which students can estimate the ratio of the area of the circle to the radius square, and also helps students understand why the same value of pi appears in both formulas for the circumference and the area of a circle.

Studying historical puzzles can give students a perspective on the usefulness of math as a tool and on the creative aspects of problem solving. Di Day offers a wonderful opportunity for such inquiry. Terrel Trotter Jr. If students are in an advanced mathematics class, then at some point they enjoyed mathematics and looked forward to learning and practicing it.

There is no reason that this passion and enjoyment should ever be lost because the subject becomes more difficult or rigorous. Try this lesson with your students as they use pi and the necessary formulas to divide a round cookie.

GeoGebra can be used to create dynamic figures to duplicate Archimedes' process of approximating and illustrate how the accuracy can be improved. This classroom inquiry covers expressing pi as the limit of a sequence of different ratios using relationships among coins and the radius of an inscribed circle.

Students learn about the relationship between circumference and diameter in the east garden of a Salvador Dali Museum exhibit. This pi day, why not have students get in a pi fight?

Okta, the octopus, hangs out near different coordinates on a unit circle, and students must choose an angle and distance to fire a pie at Okta. This activity is designed to help students practice their fluency with radian and degree measures of special angles on the unit circle and to introduce the concept of polar coordinates.

Do your algebra 1 students know that pi, because it is a ratio, is also a slope? Before you have students explore these unwrapped circles, have them predict what the graph of the unwrapped circles will look like. Will it be linear? Or will it be curved like a circle? Either before or after students construct their graph, they can grapple with what slope and rate of change would mean in this context. Does their answer change after this investigation? These sets what does a math compass look like non-routine questions about a single topic are designed to have entry points for students in middle school and to stretch students in high school mathematics.

Whether you use this as an independent investigation for students to see how far they get, or choose certain problems for small group or whole-class work, the explorations will have students looking at areas of all sorts of shapes based on folding and cutting paper circles. Toggle navigation. Log out. Log in. View Cart. Join Now. NCTM Store. Toggle navigation MENU. Log In Not a member? Celebrate Pi Day with NCTM There are many fun and innovative ways to celebrate Pi Day in your classroom and beyond—you probably already use it as a jumping-off point for what does a math compass look like mathematical lessons.

Tree Talk Illuminations If a tree could talk, we could ask it how old it is. Pushing Pennies Problems of the How to say relative in spanish Estimate the number of pennies that you can fit on a sheet of what does a math compass look like, then evaluate your estimate. Sprinkler Spray Problems of the Week Compare the radii of three sprinklers in a garden.

MTMS Why does the same value of pi appear in both formulas for the circumference and how to make 3d origami swan basket of a circle? Mathematical Explorations: Finding Pi with Archimedes's Exhaustion Method MTMS Studying historical puzzles can give students a perspective on the usefulness of math as a tool and on the creative aspects of problem solving.

Painting a Carousel Problems of the Week Help figure out the area of the deck of a carousel using only one measurement. High School Cookies and Pi MT If what does a math compass look like are what is a 598 credit score an advanced mathematics class, then at some point they enjoyed mathematics and looked forward to learning and practicing it.

Improving Approximations with for Pi with GeoGebra MT GeoGebra can be used to create dynamic figures to duplicate Archimedes' process of approximating and illustrate how the accuracy can be improved. Kissing Pennies and Eating Pi MT This classroom inquiry covers expressing pi as the limit of a sequence of different ratios using relationships among coins and the radius of an inscribed circle. Pi Line Illuminations Do your algebra 1 students know that pi, because it is a ratio, is also a slope?

Explorations with a Paper Circle Student Explorations in Math These sets of non-routine questions about a single topic are designed to have entry points for students in middle school and to stretch students in high school mathematics.

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I sit in my car and wait in the parking lot. They arrive in Chevy trucks and Dodge vans and spill out in groups of four or five under the sweat-stained hats of the 49ers, Penn State, and the Yankees. Each face wears its own weary. The year-olds look like year-olds; the year-olds, like year-olds; the year-olds, like year-olds. World Compass Academy engages and inspires learners in a safe, challenging, and individualized learning environment which cultivates and fosters character, a lifelong love of learning, and the skills to engage in the global community. Aug 12,  · For example, about 70% of scholarships awarded through the Air Force ROTC program at Texas A&M go to cadets majoring in science, technology, engineering and math fields, known as STEM, estimates U.

Photographs by Trent Davis Bailey. Illustrations by Denise Nestor. The highway runs two lanes here, three lanes there, through miles of agriculture broken every 20 minutes by fast food, gas station, and cheap motel. Pink and white oleanders divide the highway, and every third vehicle that whooshes by is a big rig. The harvest begins in January with one type of mandarin and ends in December with another type of mandarin and in between spills forth everything in your supermarket produce and dairy aisles except for bananas and mangoes, though the farmers here are working on the tropical, too.

I stick to the left lane and try to stay ahead of the pack. The big-rig drivers are cranky two ways, and the farmworkers in their last-leg vans are half-asleep. Ninety-nine is the deadliest highway in America. Deadly in the rush of harvest, deadly in the quiet of fog, deadly in the blur of Saturday nights when the fieldwork is done and the beer drinking becomes a second humiliation.

Twenty miles outside Fresno, I cross the Kings, the river that irrigates more farmland than any other river here. The Kings is bone-dry as usual. The hillocks that existed back in Yokut Indian days were flattened by a hunk of metal called the Fresno Scraper. Every river busting out of the Sierra was bent sideways, if not backward, by a bulwark of ditches, levees, canals, and dams.

The farmer corralled the snowmelt and erased the valley, its desert and marsh. He leveled its hog wallows, denuded its salt brush, and killed the last of its mustang, antelope, and tule elk.

He emptied the sky of tens of millions of geese and drained the square miles of Tulare Lake dry. He did this first in the name of wheat and then beef, milk, raisins, cotton, and nuts.

Once he finished grabbing the flow of the five rivers that ran across the plain, he used his turbine pumps to seize the water beneath the ground. As he bled the aquifer dry, he called on the government to bring him an even mightier river from afar.

Down the great aqueduct, by freight of politics and gravity, came the excess waters of the Sacramento River. The farmer moved the rain. The more water he got, the more crops he planted, and the more crops he planted, the more water he needed to plant more crops, and on and on. One million acres of the valley floor, greater than the size of Rhode Island, are now covered in almond trees.

I pity the outsider trying to make sense of it. My father, born in a vineyard outside Fresno, was a raisin grower before he became a bar owner.

I grew up in the suburbs where our playgrounds were named after the pioneers of fruit and canals of irrigation shot through our neighborhoods to the farms we did not know. For half my life, I never stopped to wonder: How much was magic? How much was plunder? Even as the supplies of federal and state water have dropped to near zero, agriculture in Kern keeps chugging along, growing more intensive. Agriculture in the south valley has extended far beyond the provisions of its one river, the Kern.

The farmers there are raising almost 1 million acres of crops, and fewer than half these acres are irrigated with flows from the Kern.

The river is nothing if not fickle. One year, it delivers , acre-feet of snowmelt. The next year, it delivers , acre-feet. To grow, Big Ag needed a bigger and more dependable supply. So beginning in the s, Kern farmers went out and grabbed a share of not one distant river but two: the San Joaquin to the north and the Sacramento to the north of that.

But not even the two projects working in perfect tandem can defy drought. When nature bites down hard, and the government flow gets reduced to a trickle, growers in Kern turn on their pumps and reach deeper into the earth. It can be squeezed only so much. As the growers punch more holes into the ground looking for a vanishing resource, the earth is sinking.

The choices for the Kern farmer now come down to two: He can reach deep into his pocket and buy high-priced water from an irrigation district with surplus supplies. Or he can devise a scheme to steal water from a neighbor up the road. I now hear whispers of water belonging to farmers two counties away being pumped out of the ground and hijacked in the dead of night to irrigate the nuts of Lost Hills.

I roll past Tulare, where every February they hold the biggest tractor show in the world, even bigger than the one in Paris. Past Delano and the first vineyards that Cesar Chavez marched against. Past McFarland and the high school runners who won five state championships in a row in the s.

Past Oildale and the boxcar where Merle Haggard grew up. The wide-open middle of California did its lullaby on me again. I turn back around and find Route 46, the road that killed James Dean.

I steer past Wasco to the dust-blowing orchards that flank Lost Hills, the densest planting of almonds, pistachios, and pomegranates on earth. This is the domain of Stewart Resnick, the richest farmer in the country and maybe the most peculiar one, too. He grew up in New Jersey, where his father ran a bar. He came to California in the s to remake himself.

Welcome to the club. He remade himself into a graduate of the UCLA law school, a cleaner of Los Angeles buildings, a vendor of security alarms, a seller of flowers in a pot, a minter of Elvis plates and Princess Diana dolls, a bottler of Fiji Island water, a farmer of San Joaquin Valley dirt. He purchased his first acre section in the late s and kept adding more sections of almonds, pistachios, pomegranates, and citrus until he stretched the lines of agriculture like no Californian before him.

Last time he checked, he told me he owned , acres of California. He is irrigating , of those acres. He uses more water than any other person in the West. His 15 million trees in the San Joaquin Valley consume more than , acre-feet of water a year.

The city of Los Angeles, by comparison, consumes , acre-feet. When he first planted seedless mandarins in the valley 17 years ago, the bees from the citrus orchards around him were flying into his groves, pollinating his flowers, and putting seeds into the flesh of his fruit.

The plastic unfurls across the grove like a giant roll of Saran Wrap. No bee can penetrate the shield, and his mandarins remain seedless. She is the brander of the empire, the final word on their Super Bowl ads, the creator of product marketing.

A husband and wife sharing the reins is rare for corporate America, rarer still for industrial agriculture. He commands his realm, and she commands hers, and he takes care to mind the line.

Lynda is making the trip on the company jet more often these days. This is a magnitude of intervention that no other agricultural company in California has ever attempted. The giving goes to college scholarships and tutors. It goes to doctors and nurses, trainers and dietitians, who track the weight of workers, prod them to exercise, and wean them off soda and tortillas.

As she announces the newest gift, the men and women in the back of the crowd smile and applaud politely and try not to show their faces to the publicity crew she has brought with her to film the event. Many are here without documents, after all. Today, most everything in this desolate reach of Kern County, save for the oil wells, belongs to Paramount Farming, which belongs to the Resnicks.

The State Water Project that allowed western Kern County to grow into a farming behemoth has given no water or very little water over the past three years amid the worst drought in California history. If this were any other part of Kern, the farmers would be reaching into the earth to make up the difference. But western Kern has no groundwater to draw from. How can this be? No rain in five years. State water dwindling year after year. No water in the ground to make up for the missing government supply.

How can another record crop be sitting pretty on these trees? I do all the calculations from the numbers I am able to gather, and I cannot figure out how these nuts are getting enough water. There is a local water bank, a kind of underground lake, that the Resnicks control. In the years of plentiful rains and heavy snowmelt, the bank fills up with more than 1 million acre-feet of stored water.

But most of this water has been spent by the Resnicks and other account holders in years two, three, and four of the drought. Whatever remains is not nearly enough to make up for the shortfall of imported water from the state. Then I get lucky. I come upon a Wonderful field man in a four-by-four truck who listens to my bewilderment and takes pity. As he drives off, he throws a clue out the window. Turn onto Twisselman Road off I-5 and continue west until it intersects with the California Aqueduct.

The water is being taken from unsuspecting farmers in an irrigation district in Tulare County more than 40 miles away. Its vastness makes you feel safe and in jeopardy at the same time. I head straight into the glare of the sun shooting over the Coast Range. Through the haze I can see the knoll of the aqueduct come closer. In a valley of dead rivers, each one killed on behalf of agriculture, the aqueduct was the one river still alive.

Its artificiality had achieved a permanence; its permanence had created my California. I pull over into the dirt of a pomegranate orchard, the ancient fruit that the Resnicks have turned into POMWonderful, the sweet purple juice inside a swell-upon-swell bottle. The shiny red orbs, three months shy of harvest, pop out from the bright green leaves like bulbs on a Christmas tree.