what is the human papillomavirus

HPV (Human Papilloma Virus)

Aug 20,  · Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common sexually transmitted infection in the United States. Some health effects caused by HPV can be prevented by the HPV vaccines. The content here can be syndicated (added to your web site). Oct 29,  · HPV, or human papillomavirus, is a common virus that can lead to 6 types of cancers later in life. You can protect your child from developing these cancers by giving HPV vaccine at ages 11–12 years. HPV infections are common HPV infections are so common that nearly all men and women will get HPV at some point in their lives.

HPV, or human papillomavirus, is a common virus that can lead to 6 types of cancers later in life. You can protect your child from developing these cancers by giving What is a medical office professional vaccine at ages 11—12 years.

HPV infections are so common that nearly all men and women will get HPV at some point in their lives.

Nearly 80 million Americans are currently infected with HPV. About 14 million Americans, including teens, become infected each year. HPV is spread through intimate skin-to-skin contact. You can get HPV by having vaginal, anal, or oral sex with someone who has the virus. Most HPV infections 9 out of 10 go away by themselves within 2 years. Pzpillomavirus sometimes, HPV what is the human papillomavirus will last longer and can cause certain types of cancers.

HPV infections can cause cancers of the:. Every year in the United States, HPV is estimated to cause nearly 36, cases of cancer in men and women. HPV vaccination can be started at age 9 years. For HPV vaccine to be most effective, the series should be given before children are ever exposed to the virus.

Children who get ppillomavirus first dose before their 15 th birthday only need two doses. Children who get the first dose on or after their 15 th birthday need three doses. Skip directly to site content Skip directly iis page options Skip directly to A-Z link.

Human Papillomavirus How to make the best homemade banana pudding. Section Navigation. Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Syndicate. About HPV. Minus Related Pages. Related Links. Links with this icon indicate that you are leaving the CDC website.

Linking to a non-federal website does not constitute an endorsement by CDC or any of its employees of the what is the human papillomavirus or the information and products presented on the website. You will be subject to the destination website's privacy policy when you follow the link. CDC is not responsible for Section compliance accessibility on other federal or private website. Cancel Continue.

HPV infections are common

What is human papillpoma virus (HPV)? HPV stands for human papilloma virus. It is a very common virus. There are about types of HPV that affect different parts of the body. Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a small, non-enveloped deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) virus that infects skin or mucosal cells. The circular, double-stranded viral genome is approximately 8-kb in length. The genome encodes for 6 early proteins responsible for virus replication and 2 late proteins, L1 and L2, which are the viral structural proteins.

HPV infection is a viral infection that commonly causes skin or mucous membrane growths warts. There are more than varieties of human papillomavirus HPV. Some types of HPV infection cause warts, and some can cause different types of cancer. Most HPV infections don't lead to cancer. But some types of genital HPV can cause cancer of the lower part of the uterus that connects to the vagina cervix. Other types of cancers, including cancers of the anus, penis, vagina, vulva and back of the throat oropharyngeal , have been linked to HPV infection.

These infections are often transmitted sexually or through other skin-to-skin contact. Vaccines can help protect against the strains of HPV most likely to cause genital warts or cervical cancer. Common warts can grow on your hands or fingers.

They're small, grainy bumps that are rough to the touch. They're usually flesh-colored, white, pink or tan. Plantar warts are caused by the same type of virus that causes warts on your hands and fingers.

But, because of their location, they can be painful. Flat warts are smaller and smoother than other warts. They generally occur on the face or legs and are more common in children and teens than in adults.

Genital warts are a common sexually transmitted infection. They can appear on the genitals, in the pubic area or in the anal canal.

In women, genital warts can also grow inside the vagina. In most cases, your body's immune system defeats an HPV infection before it creates warts. When warts do appear, they vary in appearance depending on which kind of HPV is involved:.

Genital warts. These appear as flat lesions, small cauliflower-like bumps or tiny stemlike protrusions. In women, genital warts appear mostly on the vulva but can also occur near the anus, on the cervix or in the vagina.

In men, genital warts appear on the penis and scrotum or around the anus. Genital warts rarely cause discomfort or pain, though they may itch or feel tender. Nearly all cervical cancers are caused by HPV infections, but cervical cancer may take 20 years or longer to develop after an HPV infection.

The HPV infection and early cervical cancer typically don't cause noticeable symptoms. Getting vaccinated against HPV infection is your best protection from cervical cancer. Because early cervical cancer doesn't cause symptoms, it's vital that women have regular screening tests to detect any precancerous changes in the cervix that might lead to cancer. Current guidelines recommend that women ages 21 to 29 have a Pap test every three years. Women ages 30 to 65 are advised to continue having a Pap test every three years, or every five years if they also get the HPV DNA test at the same time.

If you or your child has warts of any kind that cause embarrassment, discomfort or pain, seek advice from your doctor. HPV infection occurs when the virus enters your body, usually through a cut, abrasion or small tear in your skin. The virus is transferred primarily by skin-to-skin contact. Genital HPV infections are contracted through sexual intercourse, anal sex and other skin-to-skin contact in the genital region.

Some HPV infections that result in oral or upper respiratory lesions are contracted through oral sex. If you're pregnant and have an HPV infection with genital warts, it's possible your baby may get the infection. Rarely, the infection may cause a noncancerous growth in the baby's voice box larynx. Warts are contagious. They can spread through direct contact with a wart. Warts can also spread when someone touches something that already touched a wart.

It's difficult to prevent HPV infections that cause common warts. If you have a common wart, you can prevent the spread of the infection and formation of new warts by not picking at a wart and not biting your nails. To reduce the risk of contracting HPV infections that cause plantar warts, wear shoes or sandals in public pools and locker rooms.

The most recent was Gardasil 9, which is approved for use in males and females ages 9 to 45 to protect against cervical cancer and genital warts. It's ideal for girls and boys to receive the vaccine before they have sexual contact and are exposed to HPV.

Research has shown that receiving the vaccine at a young age isn't linked to an earlier start of sexual activity. Once someone is infected with HPV, the vaccine might not be as effective or might not work at all. Also, response to the vaccine is better at younger ages than older ones. But, if given before someone is infected, the vaccine can prevent most cases of cervical cancer. The CDC now recommends that all and year-olds receive two doses of HPV vaccine at least six months apart, instead of the previously recommended three-dose schedule.

Younger adolescents ages 9 and 10 and teens ages 13 and 14 also are able to receive vaccination on the updated two-dose schedule.

Research has shown that the two-dose schedule is effective for children under Teens and young adults who begin the vaccine series later, at ages 15 through 26, should continue to receive three doses of the vaccine. Mayo Clinic does not endorse companies or products. Advertising revenue supports our not-for-profit mission. Don't delay your care at Mayo Clinic Schedule your appointment now for safe in-person care.

This content does not have an English version. This content does not have an Arabic version. Request an appointment. Overview HPV infection is a viral infection that commonly causes skin or mucous membrane growths warts. Common warts Open pop-up dialog box Close. Common warts Common warts can grow on your hands or fingers. Plantar warts Open pop-up dialog box Close. Plantar warts Plantar warts are caused by the same type of virus that causes warts on your hands and fingers.

Flat warts Open pop-up dialog box Close. Flat warts Flat warts are smaller and smoother than other warts. Female genital warts Open pop-up dialog box Close. Female genital warts Genital warts are a common sexually transmitted infection. Male genital warts Open pop-up dialog box Close. Male genital warts Genital warts are a common sexually transmitted infection. Request an Appointment at Mayo Clinic. More Information HPV vaccine. Share on: Facebook Twitter. Show references Jameson JL, et al.

Human papillomavirus infections. In: Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine. New York, N. Accessed Feb. Bennett JE, et al. Philadelphia, Pa. American Academy of Dermatology. Human papillomavirus HPV vaccination. Rochester, Minn. Human papillomavirus HPV questions and answers. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Anogenital warts. Human papillomavirus HPV and cervical cancer. World Health Organization. Palefsky JM. Human papillomavirus infections: Epidemiology and disease associations. FDA approves expanded use of Gardasil 9 to include individuals 27 through 45 years old. Food and Drug Administration. Frequently asked questions. Gynecological problems FAQ Abnormal cervical cancer screening test results. American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. Accessed March 4, Meites E, et al.